Music students turn into music producers

Sarah+Lux++introduces+herself+to+the+class%2C+as+she+shares+her+philosophy+about+learning.+
Back to Article
Back to Article

Music students turn into music producers

Sarah Lux  introduces herself to the class, as she shares her philosophy about learning.

Sarah Lux introduces herself to the class, as she shares her philosophy about learning.

Sarah Lux introduces herself to the class, as she shares her philosophy about learning.

Sarah Lux introduces herself to the class, as she shares her philosophy about learning.

Savannah Upson

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






On Tuesday, October 9, Sarah Lux, an outreach coordinator from Full Sail University, visited biomed teacher Perry Revlett’s classes. She discussed what the college had to offer to its students.

“We have a 29-acre back-lot on campus, it includes 8 different cities,” outreach coordinator Sarah Lux said. “If you want to film in it, it is free of charge, 24 hours a day.”

In Lux’s presentation, she provided a game where she played a song, video game, or movie and the students had to guess who created it or what the title was. She did everyday titles like Perfect by Ed Sheeran and The Incredibles. After the title was guessed, she gave facts about them.

“I was meeting with the producers a few weeks ago, for the movie, The Incredibles and they told me that they made this color orange, “ Lux said. “They patented it and saturated it throughout the film, so your brain recognizes the film by this color of orange.“

Lux included a hands-on activity for the students. They formed groups of three, then were assigned a genre to base their song off. The students had 10 minutes to create the best song possible to be played in front of the class. As Lux played the songs, the audience had to clap if the song was close to the assigned style.

“I got to make music as if it was going to be used in a movie,” sophomore Briahna Martin said. “I learned what actually happens when music is recorded.”

Students in Revlett’s classes were able to take part in an on hands activity and take away new knowledge on music producing.  She provided information about the school, but she also gave the students the ability to feel similar to a music producer.

“I thought this was a fun experience and I really enjoyed it,” sophomore Emily Smith said. “My favorite part was when she had us make beats using GarageBand on the iPads.”